<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0" ><tr><td valign="top" style="font: inherit;">I was in a hurry. In my last post please delete the nonsense clause<br><br>"and this function will not be a function;"<br><br>Regards<br><br>Steve<br><br>--- On <b>Wed, 6/16/10, Baynesr@comcast.net <i><Baynesr@comcast.net></i></b> wrote:<br><blockquote style="border-left: 2px solid rgb(16, 16, 255); margin-left: 5px; padding-left: 5px;"><br>From: Baynesr@comcast.net <Baynesr@comcast.net><br>Subject: Re: Elizabeth Anscombe's Intention (New "Look Inside" feature)<br>To: "Roger Bishop Jones" <rbj@rbjones.com><br>Cc: hist-analytic@simplelists.com<br>Date: Wednesday, June 16, 2010, 9:41 PM<br><br><div id="yiv812561137"><style type="text/css">#yiv812561137 p {margin:0;}</style><div style="font-family: Arial; font-size: 12pt; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">Well, I don't think we disagree on a lot. Where you seem to<br>disagree is, I think, a misunderstanding
 of what I'm saying here.<br>Yes, I understand (I think) the logic. Nothing you say surprises<br>me, that is. But my concern with existential quantification is not<br>so much confusion on my part, as skepticism as to the role of<br>quantification is a logical description of the concept of a limit<br>in calculus. I<br><br>You say that<br><br>Lim f(x) = fa<br>x -> a<br><br>Is just a definition of continuity. Here we disagree. I don't see this<br>as a definition, at all. Do you mean 'continuity' of a function, here?<br>If so, I don't think so. This is a statement about some function 'f', not<br>just any function that is continuous. It says that the limit of this function<br>as x goes to a is f(a), that's all. Not all continuous functions have limits<br>which are such that you can substitute 'a' for 'x' in deriving the limit. So,<br>for example,  you may have a function such as f(x)=1/x, and this function<br>will not be a function; where the limit of
 the function does not exist you<br>do NOT have a limit that conforms to the "definition" above and yet,<br>contrary to what you appear to suggest, f(x)1/x is a continuous function.<br>As long as 'a' falls within the value of the function then the quoted expression<br>obtains, but in cases where it holds for all numbers BUT 'a' then it does<br>not hold and you can't simply substitute 'a' for 'x' in deriving the value of<br>the limit from the function.<br><br>Nice to hear from you. I mention you in the acknowledgments by the way.<br>Amazon has expeditiously execute every contractual obligation in a <br>timely fashion. I've benefited by your advice here as well as your thought<br>provoking comments on my last post.<br><br>Regards<br><br>Steve<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>----- Original Message -----<br>From: "Roger Bishop Jones" <rbj@rbjones.com><br>To: Baynesr@comcast.net, hist-analytic@simplelists.com<br>Sent: Wednesday, June 16, 2010 2:51:09 PM
 GMT -06:00 US/Canada Central<br>Subject: Re: Elizabeth Anscombe's Intention (New "Look Inside" feature)<br><br>On Wednesday 16 Jun 2010 17:27, you wrote:<br>> Amazon has introduced the "Look Inside" feature of my<br>>  book _Elizabeth Anscombe's Intention_. <br><br>Looks good!<br><br>> One thing on my mind as I do some<br>>  math needed for economics is the idea of a Limit in<br>>  calculus. You can simply substitute 'a' for 'x' in Lim<br>>  f(x) when f(a) is defined;<br>> x->a<br>> <br>> That is,<br>> <br>> Lim f(x) = fa<br>> x -> a<br><br>This is a definition of continuity, it won't hold, even if <br>f(a) is defined, if there is a discontinuty at a.<br>Also, there may not be a limit either,<br>Lim f(x)<br>x -> a<br>does not always exist.<br><br>> But it is defined when x goes to a, where *a* is never<br>>  reached.<br><br>The limit may then be defined, but won't necessarily =
 f(a) <br>and definitely won't, of course, if f is not defined at a. <br><br>>  So the limit may be defined even when 'a'<br>>  doesn't exist (as what x goes to), or so it seems.<br><br>I presume you mean here f is not defined at a, rather than <br>that a does not exist.<br><br>> My concern here is that quantification, e.g. UG, may be<br>>  possible where a does not exist.<br><br>This doesn't happen in any logic I know of, i.e. you only <br>quantify over things which do exist.<br>(I dare say if you were keen you could formalise a <br>Meinongian logic in which unusual things happen.)<br><br>However, you can write something like:<br><br>for all x such that P x then Q x.<br><br>which is a way of quantifying over P's whether or not there <br>are any.<br>In that case you might say, if P is always false, that you <br>have quantified over something which does not exist, though I <br>think that's a confusing way of putting it.
  Really you did <br>a restricted quantification the effect of which was to <br>quantify over nothing.<br><br>Roger Jones<br></div><tt><br>
</tt></div></blockquote></td></tr></table>