<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.6001.18349" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY id=role_body style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #000000; FONT-FAMILY: Arial" 
bottomMargin=7 leftMargin=7 topMargin=7 rightMargin=7><FONT id=role_document 
face=Arial color=#000000 size=2>
<DIV>I should revise the bibliography on this, but I am still interested, sort 
of, into the 'logic' (as ordinary language philosophers would have it) of 
'prove' _qua_ (alla Kiparskys) 'factive'.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>It seems that Grice was onto something (good or bad) when he emphasised how 
much of our ordinary talk is about 'deeming' this to be x or y (his idea of 
sublunary 'knowledge', e.g. in "Meaning Revisited", now in WoW). <BR></DIV>
<DIV>Ditto his emphasis on _implicit_ reasoning, as exegisised (?) by Warner in 
his intro to Grice's Aspects of Reason. The idea indeed that, say, if you want 
to _prove_ A from A (say), to use an example, alla R. B. Jones, of, technically, 
a 'formal proof', we have a two step proof.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>1. A (Ass)</DIV>
<DIV>2. Therefore A (Concl).</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>There are, of course, longer proofs for other things, but the logic of 
'proving' (or the _grammar_ of 'proving' as other language philosophers would 
have it) would remain the same.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>Grice makes various points on this. On the one hand, there is what the OED2 
has as "woman's reason" (I like it because I like it). This Grice relabels (in a 
way, since he does not use "woman's reason), 'trivial' reasoning, or (sometimes) 
'irrelevant' reasoning. For who would like to prove "A" out of "A"? (other than 
an OED2 'woman' that is).</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>If 'factive' is taking seriously, though, unless the complete steps of a 
'formal proof' are made explicit, perhaps we wouldn't like to say that an agent 
(say) has "proved" that p.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>Popper, alas, though he did write a book on "Proofs and Refutations" would, 
as D. Frederick would, have cared less, or would _not_ have cared less, about 
the ordinary logic or grammar of 'proving'. Indeed, if I understand Popper or D. 
Frederick aright, there's a lot of 'deeming' going on, since, well, each alleged 
'proof' is just that until _refuted_. </DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>As a historian of analytic philosophy of sorts, I am forever 
interested in the historical sources of this. And should start with the 
Philosopher's Index with essays featuring 'proving' in the title (for there's 
something of an abstract-noun quality which Toulmin calls a 'non-logical goat' 
in his Uses of Argument) that keeps me slightly apart from grandiose talk of 
'proof' as such.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>Cheers,</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>J. L. Speranza</DIV>
<DIV>    for the Grice Club, etc.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV></FONT></BODY></HTML>
<tt><br>
</tt>