<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.6001.18294" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY id=role_body style="FONT-SIZE: 10pt; COLOR: #000000; FONT-FAMILY: Arial" 
bottomMargin=7 leftMargin=7 topMargin=7 rightMargin=7><FONT id=role_document 
face=Arial color=#000000 size=2>
<DIV>I think is the title of an essay by Horn, he told me, echoing a westerner, 
and Witters, we know, loved them.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>In a message dated 10/15/2009 9:26:40 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, 
Baynesr@comcast.net writes:</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE 
style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: blue 2px solid"><FONT 
  style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: transparent" face=Arial color=#000000 size=3>But Witt 
  was dogmatic in making <SPAN class=Apple-style-span 
  style="TEXT-DECORATION: underline">this</SPAN> claim; he offered no argument 
  to support this bizarre assertion: he simply affirmed that the language-game 
  we play with "meter" does not allow either affirmation (that it is or that it 
  is not).</FONT></BLOCKQUOTE>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>----</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>In a way, it parallels my "Paying Paul to Rob Peter". </DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>In the polemic Strawson/Grice, Strawson was (they are both dead now so we 
can safely use the past tense) adamant in assuming truth-value gaps.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>Grice was confused and somewhat infuriated with that. "The king of France 
is not bald" is true, for Grice, with no king of France in view. For Strawson, 
it was truth-value gappy.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>Ditto, "The meter stick is one meter long" would be a perfectly true thing 
for me to say. But perhaps Grice's and my language games are easier to play than 
Witters's and Strawson's.</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>Cheers,</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>J. L. Speranza</DIV></FONT></BODY></HTML>
<tt><br>
</tt>