<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0" ><tr><td valign="top" style="font: inherit;">Danny,<br><br>Good point! I take this up, briefly, in the book. Accidental omissions and deliberate omission have to be distinguished. One distinction I make considerable use of, one which is implicit in your remarks is between what I call "willful" action and an "acts of will." It is something like Anscombe's distinction between being intentional but done without an intention. One example might be a particular movement of the hands in tying a fancy knot, say half way through. Or seeing a spot on your jacket and thoughtlessly brushing it off. Actually the distinction goes back to James; at least one contemporary has been credited with discovering it, but its' been around the block a couple of times. Anyway, an intentional omission is never, if I am right, a merely intentional act, rather than one one backed by its own formulated intension. The idea of a
 "formulated" intention is closely tied, historically, to what James and others called a "resolve." Say I'm on a firing squad and I don't want to shoot. I don't. I had this resolve from the beginning. I "formulated" an intention. But suppose I am walking through the wood and see a flash of color. I may shoot without formulating an intention. Also, I may turn quick and not fire at a potential threat. In this latter case, I wouldn't call it an "omission." <br><br>Best wishes<br><br>Steve<br><br>--- On <b>Wed, 7/29/09, Danny Frederick <i><danny.frederick@tiscali.co.uk></i></b> wrote:<br><blockquote style="border-left: 2px solid rgb(16, 16, 255); margin-left: 5px; padding-left: 5px;"><br>From: Danny Frederick <danny.frederick@tiscali.co.uk><br>Subject: RE: Omission and Action<br>To: hist-analytic@simplelists.com<br>Date: Wednesday, July 29, 2009, 3:07 AM<br><br><div id="yiv287940440">


 
 

<style>
<!--
#yiv287940440 #yiv1787204002  
 _filtered #yiv1787204002 {font-family:Tahoma;panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}
#yiv287940440 _filtered #yiv1787204002 {margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in;}

#yiv287940440  
 _filtered #yiv287940440 {font-family:Tahoma;panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}
#yiv287940440  
#yiv287940440 p.MsoNormal, #yiv287940440 li.MsoNormal, #yiv287940440 div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0in;margin-bottom:.0001pt;font-size:12.0pt;font-family:"Times New Roman";}
#yiv287940440 tt
        {font-family:"Courier New";}
#yiv287940440 span.emailstyle181
        {font-family:Arial;color:navy;}
#yiv287940440 span.EmailStyle20
        {font-family:Arial;color:navy;}
 _filtered #yiv287940440 {margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}
#yiv287940440 div.Section1
        {}
-->
</style>

<div class="Section1">

<p class="MsoNormal"><font size="2" color="navy" face="Arial"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial; color: navy;">Hi Steve,</span></font></p> 

<p class="MsoNormal"><font size="2" color="navy" face="Arial"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial; color: navy;">  </span></font></p> 

<p class="MsoNormal"><font size="2" color="navy" face="Arial"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial; color: navy;">Do we need to distinguish intentional, unintentional
and non-intentional omissions? I omit to do many things because I just forget to
do them (like popping into the shop on the way home): I omit them
unintentionally. I omit to do many more things because it just never occurs to
me to do them (like performing a song-and-dance routine while I am waiting for
a bus): I omit them non-intentionally. But some things I omit to do
intentionally (like omitting to talk in the cross examination). Perhaps: intentional
omissions are those that I try to omit; unintentional and non-intentional ones
are those that I do not try to omit. Unintentional omissions seem to  be
ones that conflict with our intentions or plans, whereas non-intentional ones
don’t. Just a first stab.</span></font></p> 

<p class="MsoNormal"><font size="2" color="navy" face="Arial"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial; color: navy;">  </span></font></p> 

<p class="MsoNormal"><font size="2" color="navy" face="Arial"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial; color: navy;">Danny</span></font></p> 

<div>

<div class="MsoNormal" style="text-align: center;" align="center"><font size="3" face="Times New Roman"><span style="font-size: 12pt;">

<hr tabindex="-1" size="2" width="100%" align="center">

</span></font></div>

<p class="MsoNormal"><b><font size="2" face="Tahoma"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; font-weight: bold;">From:</span></font></b><font size="2" face="Tahoma"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma;">
hist-analytic-manager@simplelists.com
[mailto:hist-analytic-manager@simplelists.com] <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">On Behalf Of </span></b>steve bayne<br>
<b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sent:</span></b> 28 July 2009 23:58<br>
<b><span style="font-weight: bold;">To:</span></b> hist-analytic@simplelists.com;
Ron Barnette<br>
<b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Subject:</span></b> RE: Omission and Action</span></font></p> 

</div>

<p class="MsoNormal"><font size="3" face="Times New Roman"><span style="font-size: 12pt;">  </span></font></p> 

<table class="MsoNormalTable" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
 <tbody><tr>
  <td style="padding: 0in;" valign="top">
  <p class="MsoNormal"><font size="3" face="Times New Roman"><span style="font-size: 12pt;">The cross examination case is good because it shows
  that the condition I mention may be necessary but is not sufficient for
  omission: The witness refuses to testify, had he testified it would have been
  an intentional act; but it is not an omission on his part but a refusal,
  suggesting that refusal and omission might belong to a larger class. <br>
  <br>
  I didn't omit calling the mayor's office because I never had that intention.
  This is another interesting case. As if to imply that had I called since it
  would have had to be intentional to be an omission and inasmuch as I had no
  such intention I, therefore did not "omit" calling the mayor.<br>
  <br>
  I have a short section devoted to Melden. Melden was far more thought
  provoking form me than Hampshiire, although other of Hampshire's works I find
  very good.<br>
  <br>
  <br>
  Regards <br>
  <br>
  Steve<br>
  --- On <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Tue, 7/28/09, Ron Barnette <i><span style="font-style: italic;"><rbarnett@valdosta.edu></span></i></span></b>
  wrote:</span></font></p> 
  <p class="MsoNormal" style="margin-bottom: 12pt;"><font size="3" face="Times New Roman"><span style="font-size: 12pt;"><br>
  From: Ron Barnette <rbarnett@valdosta.edu><br>
  Subject: RE: Omission and Action<br>
  To: "'steve bayne'" <baynesrb@yahoo.com>,
  hist-analytic@simplelists.com<br>
  Date: Tuesday, July 28, 2009, 5:04 PM</span></font></p> 
  <div id="yiv1787204002">
  <div>
  <p class="MsoNormal" style=""><font size="2" color="navy" face="Arial"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial; color: navy;">Steve,</span></font></p> 
  <p class="MsoNormal" style=""><font size="2" color="navy" face="Arial"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial; color: navy;">I’m glad to learn that you address omissions in the book,
  as they constitute a very special class---one might argue class of
  actions---in which something intentional is definitely undertaken….say,
  my deliberately remaining steadfast, perfectly still and silent during an
  intense cross-examination. My <i><span style="font-style: italic;">refusal</span></i>
  to answer a question would correctly be construed as something <i><span style="font-style: italic;">I did</span></i> intentionally, yet without overt bodily
  movement. So are there actions that do not involve bodily movements?
  Interesting implications with either ‘yes’ or ‘no,’
  no?</span></font></p> 
  <p class="MsoNormal" style=""><font size="2" color="navy" face="Arial"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial; color: navy;">Good work, Steve…Btw, this brought to mind many discussions
  on this very topic I had in the late 60’s with dear Abe Melden who (you
  know) served faithfully on my dissertation committee.</span></font></p> 
  <p class="MsoNormal" style=""><font size="2" color="navy" face="Arial"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial; color: navy;">Ron Barnette</span></font></p> 
  <p class="MsoNormal" style=""><font size="2" color="navy" face="Arial"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Arial; color: navy;"> </span></font></p> 
  <div>
  <div class="MsoNormal" style="text-align: center;" align="center"><font size="3" face="Times New Roman"><span style="font-size: 12pt;">
  <hr tabindex="-1" size="3" width="100%" align="center">
  </span></font></div>
  <p class="MsoNormal" style=""><b><font size="2" face="Tahoma"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma; font-weight: bold;">From:</span></font></b><font size="2" face="Tahoma"><span style="font-size: 10pt; font-family: Tahoma;">
  hist-analytic-manager@simplelists.com
  [mailto:hist-analytic-manager@simplelists.com] <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">On Behalf Of </span></b>steve bayne<br>
  <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sent:</span></b> Tuesday, July 28, 2009
  4:47 PM<br>
  <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">To:</span></b> hist-analytic@simplelists.com<br>
  <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Subject:</span></b> Omission and Action</span></font></p> 
  </div>
  <p class="MsoNormal" style=""><font size="3" face="Times New Roman"><span style="font-size: 12pt;"> </span></font></p> 
  <table class="MsoNormalTable" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
   <tbody><tr>
    <td style="padding: 0in;" valign="top">
    <p class="MsoNormal" style=""><font size="4" face="Times New Roman"><span style="font-size: 14pt;">I
    have a number of things to say about omissions in the book. Here are two
    sentences from that discusson. <br>
    <br>
    "We feel the compulsion, at some point, to ask: what must be added to
    an event that never happened in order to make it an omission?  An
    omission, unlike a bodily movement which had it happened would have been
    just that, viz. a bodily movement, is such a nonoccurrence of an event that
    had it occurred <i><span style="font-style: italic;">would</span></i> have
    been intentional. Omissions constitute a special class, or category,
    although Anscombe may be right to criticize Davidson on this matter, no
    one, including Anscombe, has presented a satisfactory theory concerning its
    nature."<br>
    <br>
    Steve</span></font></p> 
    </td>
   </tr>
  </tbody></table>
  <p class="MsoNormal" style=""><font size="3" face="Times New Roman"><span style="font-size: 12pt;"> </span></font></p> 
  </div>
  <p class="MsoNormal"><font size="3" face="Times New Roman"><span style="font-size: 12pt;">  </span></font></p> 
  </div>
  </td>
 </tr>
</tbody></table>

<p class="MsoNormal"><font size="3" face="Times New Roman"><span style="font-size: 12pt;">  </span></font></p> 

</div>

 

<tt><br>
</tt></div></blockquote></td></tr></table>