<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0" ><tr><td valign="top" style="font: inherit;">I meant to say "referential" when I said "attributive."<br><br>Sorry<br><br>Steve<br><br>--- On <b>Fri, 6/12/09, steve bayne <i><baynesrb@yahoo.com></i></b> wrote:<br><blockquote style="border-left: 2px solid rgb(16, 16, 255); margin-left: 5px; padding-left: 5px;"><br>From: steve bayne <baynesrb@yahoo.com><br>Subject: Re: Davidson's Hume<br>To: hist-analytic@simplelists.com<br>Date: Friday, June 12, 2009, 7:30 AM<br><br><div id="yiv1497318729"><table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"><tbody><tr><td style="font-family: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; font-size: inherit; line-height: inherit; font-size-adjust: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; -x-system-font: none;" valign="top">The attributive use of a definite description is one where a correct use is not dependent on the actual extension of the
 predicates contained in the description but, rather, pragmatic circumstances of application. Donnellan's example, as I recall, is that of situation where a man is standing across the room talking to someone at a cocktail party. I am talking to a friend who asks me who someone is, so I say "He' the man drinking the martini over there. Now, as it turns out, the man is NOT drinking a martini; he is drinking water, but there is a sense in which the description succeeds, even though he is not included in the, literal, extension of the predicate.<br><br>On Carnap, be a bit careful. At least in Meaning and Necessity he adhere to the "method of intention and extension," so meaning is not reference. <br><br>Regards<br><br>Steve<br><br><br><br><br>---
 On <b>Thu, 6/11/09, Roger Bishop Jones <i><rbj@rbjones.com></i></b> wrote:<br><blockquote style="border-left: 2px solid rgb(16, 16, 255); margin-left: 5px; padding-left: 5px;"><br>From: Roger Bishop Jones <rbj@rbjones.com><br>Subject: Re: Davidson's Hume<br>To: "steve bayne" <baynesrb@yahoo.com><br>Cc: hist-analytic@simplelists.com<br>Date: Thursday, June 11, 2009, 3:41 PM<br><br><div class="plainMail">On Wednesday 03 June 2009 14:23:45 steve bayne wrote:<br><br>>We have to distinguish at least three things.<br>><br>>1. Attributive uses of definite descriptions and referential uses.<br>> (Donnellan)<br>><br>>2. Rigid and non-rigid designation (Kripke)<br>><br>>3. Purely referential vs non purely referential designators.<br>><br>>Each has a history and some would argue, incorrectly in my opinion, that<br>> there was overlap.<br><br>Thanks for pointing that out.<br>I have to confess that I don't really
 understand any of these<br>distinctions. (groping in the dark, as usual)<br><br>A brief search for enlightenment on Donellan left me doubting<br>that the distinction in use which he is discussing reflects<br>any underlying difference in meaning or sense.<br><br>On Kripke, so far as I understand him, his separation of<br>necessity from analyticity depends on it being coherent<br>to suppose that something can be a rigid designator without<br>that being a consequence of its meaning.<br><br>So that brings me to wonder about what is now meant by<br>speaking of something as purely referential.<br>Presumably it means that the designator has no sense<br>apart from its reference, but I don't know whether the<br>case that the meaning *is* the denotation counts as<br>purely referential or whether that term is reserved for<br>the case that the reference is contingent and the designator<br>meaningless.<br><br>>In "Reference and Modality" Quine notes that while
 '9>7' is a necessary<br>> truth 'The number of planets > 7' is not a necessary truth because the<br>> number of planets is a contingent fact. The source of the problem is that<br>> 'The number of planets' is not purely referential. We find something<br>> similar in Russell's "logically proper names." Donnellan's distinction may<br>> show itself within a single world and says nothing about other possible<br>> worlds, while (as you know) rigidity is very much about "worlds." These<br>> distinctions do not require much of anything with respect to what we know.<br>> It is a semantical not an epistemological conception.<br><br>If meaning is used in the same way as Carnap and I use it,<br>then, if the meaning of a designator is the thing<br>which it designates, that designator will be rigid.<br>Furthermore in relation to this kind of semantics, (which<br>we might call a full truth conditional semantics), this is<br>the only way
 in which you can get a rigid designator, and<br>results in the disappearance of Kripke's counterexamples<br>to the analytic/necessary identification.<br><br>Whether we are talking about different uses in one world<br>or uses in different worlds, the touchstone is the semantics,<br>and this ought to result in there being connections between<br>these issues (if indeed they are anything to do with meaning,<br>as one might doubt for the Donellan distinction).<br><br>>In 'The cause of e caused e' IF we take ' the cause of e' attributively'<br>> then my claim is that the sentence 'The cause of e caused e' is contingent.<br><br>Perhaps you could expand for me on the "attributive" use, and how it<br>yields this result?<br><br>Having just read Strawson I think he would say, and I would agree,<br>that e having a unique cause is presupposed here and that the<br>sentence has the status of being true whenever it has a truth<br>value, but in many possible
 worlds lacking one.<br>Though one might very reasonably insist that in those cases it<br>is false.<br><br>> On the other hand if we think of the sentence as completely devoid of<br>> pragmatic elements, and here I have in mind Jerry Katz's notion of<br>> 'linguistic meaning' then the sentence is trivial, like 'I married my<br>> wife'.<br><br>Can't say I like the idea that its trivial.<br><br>> So it's not so much which is the right reading but what you get on<br>> different readings.<br><br>But we have been here before and this looks to me like a non-sequitur.<br>How have you come to the conclusion that there is no basis for<br>considering one reading correct and the other mistaken?<br><br>I did offer some reasoning for not taking descriptions<br>as "purely referential" but you haven't responded to them.<br><br>regards,<br>Roger Jones<br></div></blockquote></td></tr></tbody></table><tt><br>
</tt></div></blockquote></td></tr></table>