<html><head><style type='text/css'>p { margin: 0; }</style></head><body><div style='font-family: Arial; font-size: 12pt; color: #000000'>I agree with Prof. Aune that  "we should  consider that it was contingent all along."<br>We might, even, want to "extend" the contingency. We might want to say that<br>causes may be contingently causes and, also, it is only contingent that a cause has<br>a certain effect. This is the thesis that causes do not determine, even if they *are*<br>causes. I don't believe in the long run this will hold up. However, I am skeptical of<br>the idea that the cause and effect relation between events described in the sentence<br>'my tripping caused me to fall' is, ultimately, a conflation of laws taken together with<br>initial conditions. In other words I think there is much to be said for singular causation<br>in the sense of Ducasse. I'm still undecided but the Humean position, I no longer believe,<br>is impregnable. <br><br>Regards<br><br>Steve<br><br>----- Original Message -----<br>From: "Bruce Aune" <aune@philos.umass.edu><br>To: "steve bayne" <baynesrb@yahoo.com><br>Cc: hist-analytic@simplelists.com<br>Sent: Tuesday, May 26, 2009 6:51:24 AM GMT -08:00 US/Canada Pacific<br>Subject: Re: Davidson's Hume<br><br><br><br>I am late to respond to Steve’s rejoinder to my observation because I  <br>have been occupied with non-philosophic matters. I have not read all  <br>the comments his original email provoked, so I may be covering old  <br>ground. But I would like to clarify my earlier remark a little, anyway.<br><br>When I spoke of Davidson’s error, I had in mind the fact that “the  <br>cause of b caused b” contains a definite description, which Davidson,  <br>thinking of Russell rather than Donnellan, should have taken to imply  <br>that b has one and only one cause. In a subsequent note Steve asked  <br>what happens if we deny “the cause of b caused b.”  >From a Russellian  <br>point of view, the definite description in the denied sentence shows  <br>it to be equivalent to “There is one and only one cause of b and this  <br>one thing caused b: in symbols, “Ex[(y)(Cyb <-> y=x] & Cxb].” The  <br>denial of this quantified sentence, expressed in English, reduces to  <br>“Either there is more than one cause of b or b has no cause.”  The  <br>error I said Davidson made amounted to neglecting the logical  <br>possibility that b has more than one cause. In speaking of logical  <br>possibility here, I mean possibility in the narrow logical (or  <br>formal) sense, not possibility in some broader sense. It is not a  <br>logical truth that an occurrence has exactly one cause.  It is not a  <br>logical truth that an occurrence has any cause at all.<br><br>Steve did mention the possibility that the definite description “the  <br>cause of b” might be used purely referentially in the given sentence,  <br>not attributively.  When Donnellan introduced the notion of a purely  <br>referential description, he observed that such a description may pick  <br>out a referent that does not strictly satisfy it. He illustrated this  <br>by an example like this:  “The man over there drinking a martini is  <br>my thesis advisor.” The referent of the description is a certain man,  <br>one that the speaker believes to be drinking a martini.  But that man  <br>may not actually be drinking a martini; he may be drinking water in a  <br>martini glass.  But the "referential" description might pick him out  <br>just the same. Suppose that ”the cause of b” is used, in “The cause  <br>of b caused b,” in this referential sense. Although the speaker uses  <br>the description to refer to an occurrence he or she believes to be  <br>the cause of b, the speaker’s belief may be false: the actual cause  <br>of b may have been some other occurrence.  If this is so, the  <br>speaker’s statement is contingently false.  I think we should  <br>consider that it was contingent all along.<br><br>Bruce</div></body></html><tt><br>
</tt>