<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0" ><tr><td valign="top" style="font: inherit;">Wesley Salmon in _Scientific Explanation and <br>the Causal Structure of the World_, Princeton<br>1984 incorporated the idea of a "pseudo-process"<br>into his probabilistic theory of causation. He<br>relies on Reichenbach (_The Direction of Time_) <br>as his source on what pseudo-processes are, etc.<br>The most accessible information on the topic is:<br><br>http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/causation-process/<br><br>There is a lot here on Russell on causation. It's <br>a good essay; not sure who wrote it. I've just<br>completed an essay "Intention, Entrainment and<br>Pseudo-Processes, which is an attenuated statement<br>of my larger theory. Probably the most original<br>aspect of the theory I propose is that a pseudo-<br>process is not epiphenomenal. This, to the best<br>of my knowledge has never been suggested before. <br>I think the reason is that if a
 process has an<br>effect, then that effect becomes incorporated into<br>the causal process. But this is simply a mistake.<br>Take any pseudo-process. Observe it, say a moving<br>shadow. Your observation is the result of its <br>effect on you, and yet it is not, itself a causal<br>process. Part of the issue is the individuation of<br>processes. But I want to set that aside to make<br>an historical point.<br><br>Reichenbach just might not be the guy to cite on<br>this matter. Note the above essay out of Stanford<br>cites Reichenbach, probably because its source is<br>Salmon. But here is something I discovered only<br>recently. The description of such processes as we<br>find it reported by Salmon is almost exactly the<br>description we find in Eddington (_Nature of the<br>Physical World_ Ann Arbor, 1958). Actually, these<br>are the Gifford Lectures. If you turn to pp. 56-<br>59 you will find a detailed account of what a<br>pseudo-process is, one that fits
 Reichenbach<br>perfectly. I know that these processes were<br>controversial during the early years of relativity<br>theory. I made the attempt to find what is<br>probably the best scientific account, Milton<br>Rothman ("Things that Go Faster Than Light" in<br>Scientific American (July 1960). But someone had,<br>as we used to say, "liberated it." Well, if anyone<br>has good access to JSTOR or some such and it's easy<br>to do, could you forward a copy. I'll find it<br>sometime soon, since SA is a popular journal.<br><br>It is interesting that Eddington would never<br>receive any credit here. <br><br><br>Steve Bayne</td></tr></table><tt></tt>